About Otis Wilder

Professional Development prognosticator, Instructional Design impresario, Educational Psychology elevator.

Preparing and Teaching an Online Course: The Podcast Episode 3

Podcast auf dem Smartphone

If you’re an instructor, instructional designer, or interested in education, then you should definitely check out a new podcast that the OLITS crew is debuting. If you’d like to be a fly on the wall as an instructor goes through preparing and teaching an online course, then give this podcast a listen. We will be updating with new episodes throughout the semester and mixing some strategies you may want to incorporate into your courses.

Episode 3

Episode 2

Episode 1

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Preparing and Teaching an Online Course: The Podcast Episode 2

Podcast auf dem Smartphone

If you’re an instructor, instructional designer, or interested in education, then you should definitely check out a new podcast that the OLITS crew is debuting. If you’d like to be a fly on the wall as an instructor goes through preparing and teaching an online course, then give this podcast a listen. We will be updating with new episodes throughout the semester and mixing some strategies you may want to incorporate into your courses.

Episode 2

Episode 1

The conversation of accountability

A recent article in The Chronicle of Higher Education highlighted an interview with a Missouri lawmaker introducing a bill which proposes a number of changes to the way his state universities are accountable to students, along with the removal tenure, which Rep. Rick Bratten called “un-American.” The bill (House Bill 266) also seeks to force universities to post information along with their degree offerings which include: estimated degree cost, types of employment associated with the degree, a prospectus of the job market, and other employment data.

While this post is not meant to offer a position on this matter, it is meant to highlight the conversation that is taking place in state legislatures across the country. There is another bill being introduced in Iowa proposing the removal of tenure as well. I suspect that bills of this nature will continue to be seen in the future. Where do we stand as a university?

The CITL, OLITS, and the Nelson Poynter Memorial Library are opening a dialog on the workplace of tomorrow and how we can support our students in it through our annual Bay-to-Bay Learning Symposium on Feb 10, 2017. Come and join us for a full day of interactive material with our dynamic speakers and specific take-home techniques you can use with your students. For tickets, which are going fast, contact David Brodosi via email.

Using Roll Call Attendance in Canvas

Canvas has a nifty feature that allows you to electronically mark attendance for your classes. If you would like to use this feature for your spring courses there are a few things you should know about Roll Call.

  • Roll Call is located in the left-hand column of Canvas and is listed simply as Attendance. This should not be confused with USF First Day Attendance. Roll Call is meant to be used throughout the semester.
  • Once you activate Roll Call Attendance, it will automatically create an assignment worth 100 points and a corresponding column in your gradebook worth 100 points. You can change the point totals to reflect the weight of attendance in your syllabus.
  • You can also adjust the value of attendance when someone is late. The default is 80% for that day.

If you would like to learn more about Roll Call, you can visit the Canvas Instructor Guides, or send me an email and I will be happy to sit down with you to show you how it works!

Best,

Otis

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Students and Technology

This rather revealing infographic examines how students interact with their technology. For many of us, it can be difficult to envision how to use the technology students already possess to improve outcomes and engagement. This spring OLITS and CITL will be hosting a number of new workshops on how to effectively integrate technology in your courses. Stay tuned for our Spring 2017 Workshop Calendar.

2016-technology-infographic

Being student-centered to address the “skills gap”

The responsibility of colleges and universities to prepare students for their next step in life, be it grad school or the work force, has been a fairly hot topic over the last few years. Any number of politicians, including many here in Florida, have weighed in with their opinions on the matter. A recent book review from Inside Higher Ed addressed the “skills gap” issue head on. A key point raised by the authors highlights how a “diversified repertoire of skills” can help students succeed in any situation. The authors also discuss what employers were looking for in their new hires. Hora and Benbow state, “employers we spoke with described their ideal candidate as a hardworking, technically astute individual with strong problem-solving and communication skills who can work effectively as part of a team.”

All of us here at OLITS and the CITL are committed to helping our faculty create world-class learning opportunities for our students. Join the conversation and help us prepare our students to be the best of who they can be.

Breaking down misconceptions in the learning process

When students show up for your class they don’t show up as a blank slate. They bring with them a litany of prior experience and knowledge. For the most part, this is a good thing. We want students with a variety of knowledge and skills which will allow them to build on what they know. But sometimes, prior knowledge can inhibit learning. There are common misconceptions in every discipline that we, as faculty, must work to overcome. This is no easy task. Prior knowledge can be as stubborn as an old tree stump, especially when we are trying to plant a new seed for learning to grow.

The American Psychological Association recently published a great tool to help educators break down student misconceptions during their teaching practice through a variety of means. This interactive site covers everything from basic do’s and don’ts to creating cognitive conflict as a means to promote learning new information. We encourage you to try some of these strategies in your own class. Then, let us know how it worked!

How Do I Get My Students Over Their Alternative Conceptions (Misconceptions) for Learning?